domingo, 5 de agosto de 2012

The state of Brazil's Amazon


An aerial view of a natural lake fed by a spring in the Amazon River basin near Manaus, September 30, 2010. REUTERS/Ivan Canabrava


Yawalapiti tribe members catch fish in the Xingu National Park, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, May 7, 2012.
REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino


A Yawalapiti boy dips his head into the Xingu River in the Xingu National Park, Mato Grosso State, May 9, 2012. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino


A group of Amazon Indians protests on an earth barrier that is part of the construction of the massive Belo Monte hydroelectric dam, in Vitoria do Xingu July 7, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho


Geovani Santos collects water from a weir which has nearly dried up as a consequence of the drought in Maracas at Bahia state, northeast Brazil May 4, 2012. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Residents ride a motorcycle over the dried Rio de Contas river in Porto Alegre community in Bahia state, northeast Brazil May 3, 2012. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Kwykyti, 63, of the Kayapo tribe, waits for a medical exam on the first day of a visit by the "Expedicionarios da Saude" (Brazilian Health Expeditions), in the Kikretum community in Sao Felix, northern Brazil, April 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho


A tree stump sits in a clear cut by a timber company next to the village of Areias in Trairao, state of Para May 27, 2012. In the 19 months since Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff took office, longstanding rules that curtail deforestation and protect millions of square kilometers of watershed have been rolled back. She issued an executive order to shrink or repurpose seven protected woodlands, making way for hydroelectric dams and other infrastructure projects, and to legalize settlements by farmers and miners. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


Dogs sit on the window sills of a house flooded by water from the Rio Solimoes river, a major tributary of the Amazon, in Anama May 21, 2009. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly/Amazonaspress


A woman walks on make-shift platforms above the floodwaters at the district of Maynas, in Peru's Amazon city of Iquitos April 9, 2012. REUTERS/Musuk Nolte


A woman arranges flowers inside a church in the village of Pimentel in Itaituba next to the Tapajos river, in the state of Para May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


Children watch television inside a house in the village of Areias in Trairao, state of Para May 27, 2012.
REUTERS/Nacho Doce


An elderly woman rests next to her grandchild in a hammock inside their house in the village of Pimental in Itaituba, in the state of Para May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


A woman washes clothes in the Tapajos river in the village of Pimental in Itaituba, state of Para May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


A man carries a bucket with fish from the Tapajos river in the village of Pimental in Itaituba, state of Para May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


A woman from the Yanomamy tribe waits for medical attention at the Cartucho community during a medical expedition in Santa Izabel do Rio Negro, in Amazonas state in northern Brazil, November 8, 2010. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Fourteen-year-old Elisany Silva (C), who measures 2.06 meters (6'9") tall poses for a picture with her sisters Talicia (R) and Eliza in Braganca in the Brazilian Amazon state of Para August 29, 2010. REUTERS/Paulo Santos


An aerial view shows a single tree seen on land that was previously jungle in Mato Grosso state, one of the Brazilian states suffering from deforestation, August 9, 2005. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos


A man sits in the village of Areias in Trairao, state of Para, May 27, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


The Amazon forest burns next to the city of Mandaquiri, November 28, 2009. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker


Ana Aparecida, 22, collects water from a nearly dried-up weir in Fumaca community in Maracas in Bahia state, northeast Brazil May 5, 2012. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Chief Raoni of the Caiapo tribe from the Amazon basin smokes a pipe while demonstrating against the construction of the planned Belo Monte hydroelectric dam, in Brasilia February 8, 2011. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino


An aerial view shows people protesting against Amazon deforestation during the 2009 World Social Forum in the city of Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, January 27, 2009. About 1, 000 protestors made a formation in the shape of an Amazon Indian man holding a bow and arrow. The words read, "Save the Amazon". REUTERS/Paulo Santos


Illegally logged trees are stored on a truck which was abandoned on the side of the Trans-Amazonian highway near the village of Areias in Trairao, in the state of Para May 27, 2012. REUTERS/Nacho Doce


A Kayapo boy plays on a swing on the first day of a visit by the "Expedicionarios da Saude" (Brazilian Health Expeditions), in the Kikretum community in Sao Felix, northern Brazil, April 22, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


A Kayapo boy with traditional body paint and piercing is seen at his home the day before the start of the "Expedicionarios da Saude" (Brazilian Health Expeditions), in the Kikretum community in Sao Felix, northern Brazil, April 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


A Yawalapiti wrestler rests in the Xingu National Park, Mato Grosso State, May 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino


A man works on the roof of a campaign hospital built by the "Expedicionarios da Saude" (Brazilian Health Expeditions) on the first day of the medical expedition at the Kayapo tribe in Sao Felix, northern Brazil, April 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes


Claudinice Silva, 30, carries a bucket of water collected from a nearly dried-up weir as she walks with her cousin Maciel, 4, in Fumaca community in Maracas in Bahia state, northeast Brazil May 5, 2012.
REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Credits: Reuters
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